Lolita

By Vladimir Nabokov

Summary:

This story is based around the disturbing abduction of a young girl. The main character- Humbert, moves into a home with a middle-aged, single mother with her twelve year old daughter. Humbert finds a pediophilic attraction towards ‘Lolita,’ and since this novel is written from Humberts perspective, he frequently refers to her as a nymphet whom he is sexually, obsessed with. Seeing this book is written from Humberts perspective, it becomes much more controversial, as it is hard to understand the perspective of other characters while they play a role in his obsession with his Lolita.

My Opinion:

This was easily my favorite book out of all of the ones I have read so far. This novel is a great example of how the audience may not be able to trust the narrator. From Humbert’s standpoint, he easily twists the confrontations between him and Lolita to allow beneficial beliefs on his part. His tone is one that suggests he is not fully responsible for the scenarios that occur between him and Lolita. He pushes his focus towards Lolita’s attitude and creates her character to seem more submissive than what is blatantly controversial to her role as a twelve year old.

The story is written in a sophisticated style, making it more difficult to stay focused on the perspective of the young girl. Once the style of writing is understood more clearly, it becomes apparent to the audience that Humbert is writing in a way that benefits his character. Obviously, a twelve year old girl is not going to be as openly submissive as Humbert tries to persuade the audience to believe.

It is rather obvious that Humbert is aware of his disturbing, pediophilic tendencies but he is obsessively, infatuated with Lolita. This making it even more difficult for him to push his pediophilic tendencies aside. It becomes clear to the audience that Humbert is truly, in love with Lolita. However, the presentation of this disturbing love, makes it apparent that it will not prosper spiritually or physically, as Lolita begins to mature.

Rating:

10/10

All The Bright Places

By Jennifer Niven

Summary:

This story is ultimately, a tragic love story. Finch is a fairly mentally distraught high school kid who does not necessarily understand the idea of “self-care.” He does not know how to express his innermost feelings as well as ask from help, as far as mental health. Violet is also a mentally distraught high school kid, ultimately from the idea that her parents are putting so much pressure on her to get over the death of her older sister. Finch and Violet meet at an extremely unordinary place and the circumstances are rather different than most, as far as a typical societal stance. As their relationship grows, Finch finds it harder to control his mental battles. Violet is unaware and begins to understand when Finch draws himself from her with no explanation.

My Opinion:

I personally really enjoyed this novel for a few different reasons. The most important being that, this story shows that not every story has a happy ending. I particularly like the idea that the author created the two main characters as people struggling from poor mental health. The only difference is how they acquired poor mental health. The author created Finch in such a unique way that the audience begins to see him as a ‘freak’ but edgy and attractive as well. I love that the two main characters come from completely different backgrounds.

One thing I would critique, is the flow of the story. Although, there is suspense in the back and forth manner between Violet and Finch each chapter, the lack of explanation towards some details, leaves the audience confused yet compelled.

Rating:

9/10